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San Diego Mayor makes his case for a "new California Republican"




In a Monday, Feb. 3, 2014 photo, San Diego mayoral candidate Kevin Faulconer engages in conversation with supporter Lilly Cheng during a campaign event, in San Diego. Faulconer easily topped a field of 11 candidates in a first round of voting by dominating in wealthier neighborhoods north of the freeway. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi)
In a Monday, Feb. 3, 2014 photo, San Diego mayoral candidate Kevin Faulconer engages in conversation with supporter Lilly Cheng during a campaign event, in San Diego. Faulconer easily topped a field of 11 candidates in a first round of voting by dominating in wealthier neighborhoods north of the freeway. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi)
Lenny Ignelzi/AP

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Earlier this week, San Diego mayor, Kevin Faulconer, spoke about his vision for the "new California Republican."

"It's time to offer California a GOP with broad appeal again," Mayor Faulconer said. "Because a vibrant competitive Republican party is good for our state."

Mayor Faulconer's vision for the party includes policies he thinks the GOP should embrace and what individuals they should better serve.

"Clearly, he has his eyes on the potential for moving up in some sort of statewide role," Michael Smolens, government and politics reporter for the San Diego Union Tribune, told Take Two's A Martinez.

While Mayor Faulconer has dismissed the notion of running for governor, Smolens said that the San Diego mayor's party has embraced the idea of him expanding his influence.  

"I think the Republicans are also tired of losing. California is becoming bluer and bluer by the day. There's no statewide GOP official in the office now. He still obviously wants to be a statewide player and maybe help form a real change in the California Republican party."

Quotes have been edited for clarity.

To hear the full conversation, click the blue player above.