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Trump's Charlottesville remarks ruffle the rest of the GOP




NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 15: US President Donald Trump delivers remarks following a meeting on infrastructure at Trump Tower, August 15, 2017 in New York City. He fielded questions from reporters about his comments on the events in Charlottesville, Virginia and white supremacists. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 15: US President Donald Trump delivers remarks following a meeting on infrastructure at Trump Tower, August 15, 2017 in New York City. He fielded questions from reporters about his comments on the events in Charlottesville, Virginia and white supremacists. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The fallout from Charlottesville continues unabated following President Trump's press conference at Trump Tower Tuesday. The topic was supposed to be infrastructure, but the conversation soon turned to the violence in Charlottesville -- and Trump's response to it.

During the questioning, the president stuck to his initial remarks. The protesters and counter-protesters were both at fault.

"Yes, I think there's blame on both sides," said the president, addressing reporters. "I think there's blame on both sides. And I have no doubt about it. And you don't have any doubt about it either."

Many Congressional Republicans have taken steps to distance themselves from the president, although the path forward for the GOP, and its troubled relationship with the president, remains uncertain. 

To get a sense of where things stand, Take Two host A Martínez spoke with Mike Madrid, Republican strategist at the Grassroots Lab, and Jeremy Carl, a Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford.  

To listen to the interview, use the blue media player above.