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What the election says about the political faultlines of SoCal




Local residents learn about the history of African-American voting in the U.S., review issues that will be on the ballot, and register to vote during the 5th annual Power Fest Music and Art Festival in Martin Luther King Jr. Park on Saturday, Sept. 3, 2016.
Local residents learn about the history of African-American voting in the U.S., review issues that will be on the ballot, and register to vote during the 5th annual Power Fest Music and Art Festival in Martin Luther King Jr. Park on Saturday, Sept. 3, 2016.
Susanica Tam for KPCC

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Voters in Southern California chose Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump by a wide margin in the recent presidential election. Los Angeles, Riverside and San Bernardino counties all went to the Democratic candidate. A majority of Orange County voters chose the Democrat for the first time since the Great Depression.

But there were plenty of people who selected Donald Trump on their ballots and the political map is more complex than first glance suggests.

"The real story about California, is that in some ways it's kind of like America fast-forward," said Manuel Pastor, professor of Sociology, American Studies & Ethnicity at the University of Southern California. "Its demographic change between 1980 and 2000 is roughly the demographic change the U.S. is going to go through between 2000 and 2050."

That's led to a younger and more diverse population, but it also points to what could be increasing division in the future.

"I think California is about to get into a fairly big conflict with the federal government," said Pastor. One of the most contentious issues is likely to be immigration, he said, but other issues, such as the economy, trade and education could also be points of conflict.