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Why foreclosed homes and used tires spread Zika virus




An Aedes Aegypti mosquito is photographed on human skin in a lab of the International Training and Medical Research Training Center (CIDEIM) on January 25, 2016, in Cali, Colombia. CIDEIM scientists are studying the genetics and biology of Aedes Aegypti mosquito which transmits the Zika, Chikungunya, Dengue and Yellow Fever viruses, to control their reproduction and resistance to insecticides. The Zika virus, a mosquito-borne disease suspected of causing serious birth defects, is expected to spread to all countries in the Americas except Canada and Chile, the World Health Organization said. AFP PHOTO/LUIS ROBAYO / AFP / LUIS ROBAYO        (Photo credit should read LUIS ROBAYO/AFP/Getty Images)
An Aedes Aegypti mosquito is photographed on human skin in a lab of the International Training and Medical Research Training Center (CIDEIM) on January 25, 2016, in Cali, Colombia. CIDEIM scientists are studying the genetics and biology of Aedes Aegypti mosquito which transmits the Zika, Chikungunya, Dengue and Yellow Fever viruses, to control their reproduction and resistance to insecticides. The Zika virus, a mosquito-borne disease suspected of causing serious birth defects, is expected to spread to all countries in the Americas except Canada and Chile, the World Health Organization said. AFP PHOTO/LUIS ROBAYO / AFP / LUIS ROBAYO (Photo credit should read LUIS ROBAYO/AFP/Getty Images)
LUIS ROBAYO/AFP/Getty Images

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Florida Governor Rick Scott announced today that there are now 14 cases of the Zika virus concentrated in one Miami neighborhood.

It was likely transmitted in each of those cases by mosquitos.

But what if Zika's spread could also be driven by global economic forces?

For more, Take Tw's Libby Denkmann spoke with Sonia Shah . She's the author of the book "Pandemic: Tracking Contagions, From Cholera to Ebola and Beyond."  

She recently wrote about the possibility of Zika in foreclosed homes for the Washington Post.

Press the blue play button above to hear the interview.