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Many Dream Act scholarships are not reaching students




File photo: Students throw their caps during a mock graduation ceremony at the West Front of the U.S. Capitol April 20, 2004 in Washington, D.C.. Several hundred students and advocates took part in the ceremony and urged Congress and the Bush administration to pass the Dream Act, which would put U.S.-raised immigrant students on the path to college and U.S. citizenship.
File photo: Students throw their caps during a mock graduation ceremony at the West Front of the U.S. Capitol April 20, 2004 in Washington, D.C.. Several hundred students and advocates took part in the ceremony and urged Congress and the Bush administration to pass the Dream Act, which would put U.S.-raised immigrant students on the path to college and U.S. citizenship.
Alex Wong/Getty Images

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The California Dream Act provides some undocumented students with state-based financial aid, but much of that going is going unspent. 

After passing the California Dream Act, much of the aid is still not reaching the students it originally intended to help. The law allows students to attend community colleges, California State Universities, University of California and even some private schools.

To find out why, we're joined by Lupita Cortez Alcala, she's the executive director of the California Student Aid Commission.