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The continued struggle between encryption and law enforcement




File: Apple CEO Tim Cook shows off the iPhone 6 and the Apple Watch during an Apple special event at the Flint Center for the Performing Arts on Sept. 9, 2014 in Cupertino.
File: Apple CEO Tim Cook shows off the iPhone 6 and the Apple Watch during an Apple special event at the Flint Center for the Performing Arts on Sept. 9, 2014 in Cupertino.
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The clash between Apple and the federal government has raised a lot of debate about privacy versus security in relation to the mass shooting in San Bernardino.

But this isn't the only case where an encrypted phone has thwarted law enforcement. 

At a news conference held last week, investigators in New York City noted that as of now 175 Apple devices are sitting in a cybercrime lab because of embedded encryption. 

New York Police Chief Bill Bratton said a prisoner was recently recorded saying that iPhone encryption was "another gift from God."

For more on how encrypted phones are used in criminal investigations, Alex Cohen spoke to the LAPD's Deputy Chief of Counter-Terrorism and Special Operations Bureau, Michael Downing.

To hear the full interview, press the blue play button above.