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'Water: Our Thirsty World' displays global challenges of H2O




Brown with sediment loosed by seasonal rains, Australia’s King River snakes through the coastal mudflats of the Kimberley, a remote northwestern region. In the dry months of May to September, the 76-mile meander lies bare.
Brown with sediment loosed by seasonal rains, Australia’s King River snakes through the coastal mudflats of the Kimberley, a remote northwestern region. In the dry months of May to September, the 76-mile meander lies bare.
Theo Allofs, CorbisAustralia, 2006, courtesy Aquarium of the Pacific
Brown with sediment loosed by seasonal rains, Australia’s King River snakes through the coastal mudflats of the Kimberley, a remote northwestern region. In the dry months of May to September, the 76-mile meander lies bare.
In Shekana, Ethiopia, Halike Berisha (left) must fill her jug from a contaminated reservoir. Access to clean water is not solely a rural problem, but the challenges of delivering it are most daunting in remote places. Ethopia, 2009
Lynn Johnson, National Geographic magazine, courtesy Aquarium of the Pacific
Brown with sediment loosed by seasonal rains, Australia’s King River snakes through the coastal mudflats of the Kimberley, a remote northwestern region. In the dry months of May to September, the 76-mile meander lies bare.
India’s holiest river, the Ganges, is scribbled with light from floating oil lamps during the Ganga Dussehra festival in Haridwar. Hindus near death often bathe in the river; some are later cremated beside it and have their ashes scattered in its depths.
John Stanmeyer, VII India, 2009, courtesy Aquarium of the Pacific
Brown with sediment loosed by seasonal rains, Australia’s King River snakes through the coastal mudflats of the Kimberley, a remote northwestern region. In the dry months of May to September, the 76-mile meander lies bare.
The Maya believed natural wells, such as the Xkeken cenote in Mexico’s Yucatán, led to the underworld. Water flows through human existence, scribing a line between life and death.
John Stanmeyer, VII Mexico, 2009, courtesy Aquarium of the Pacific


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While California's drought drags on, a new show at the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach puts the need for water in a global perspective.

"Water: Our Thirsty World" features the works of photographers from National Geographic magazine.

Host Alex Cohen recently caught up with Jerry Schubel, president and CEO of Aquarium of the Pacific, for a look at the exhibition.

To listen to the full interview, click on the blue audio player above.