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Police shootings near 400 nationwide, new analysis finds




Demonstrators march during a protest against the acquittal of Michael Brelo, a patrolman charged in the shooting deaths of two unarmed suspects, Saturday, May 23, 2015, in Cleveland. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
Demonstrators march during a protest against the acquittal of Michael Brelo, a patrolman charged in the shooting deaths of two unarmed suspects, Saturday, May 23, 2015, in Cleveland. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
John Minchillo/AP

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Nationwide, police have shot and killed 385 people to date, which works out to more than two fatal shootings a day.

That's from the Washington Post, which has been tracking such deaths this year.

Highlights of report:

  • Two-thirds of victims who were unarmed were black or Hispanic. Overall, about half the victims were white.
  • More than 80 percent of victims were armed with potentially lethal objects, such as a gun or weapon.
  • Nearly a quarter of those killed, or 92, were identified as mentally ill.

The paper also found that among all those instances, just three cases have resulted with an officer charged with a crime, or about 1 percent.

The data shows that the shootings are on pace to hit nearly 1,000 for the year, which is about double the official stats that the FBI collects. That indicates that the FBI data, which is voluntary, is probably incomplete, said Washington Post reporter Wesley Lowery.

Washington Post's "Fatal police shootings in 2015 approaching 400 nationwide"