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Picture This - Artifacts of a Kidnapping




The burqa that Leila Kaleva wore during her nearly five months of captivity in Yemen by Al Qaeda.
The burqa that Leila Kaleva wore during her nearly five months of captivity in Yemen by Al Qaeda.
Glenna Gordon
The burqa that Leila Kaleva wore during her nearly five months of captivity in Yemen by Al Qaeda.
Wolfgang Ebner wrote out his last will and testament in his notebook while he was being held hostage by an Al Qaeda affiliated group. His wife was close to death several times after falling sick and Ebner feared for his life too.
The burqa that Leila Kaleva wore during her nearly five months of captivity in Yemen by Al Qaeda.
Harald Ickler was wearing this tshirt when he was taken hostage by al Al Qaeda affiliated terrorist group in the Saharah desert in 2003. The shirt was originally grey, but turned brown and was soon covered with sweat and stains as he wore it every day during his 54 day captivity. He never washed it, and even more than a decade later, the shirt still retained a distinct odor.
Glenna Gordon
The burqa that Leila Kaleva wore during her nearly five months of captivity in Yemen by Al Qaeda.
Before ISIS gave Nicholas Henin a toothbrush, the cut the bottom of it off so it couldn't be chiseled into a weapon. Henin, a French journalist, was held captive in Syria for ten months by Islamic extremists who later executed James Foley and other hostages and broadcast the videos to the world on youtube.
Glenna Gordon
The burqa that Leila Kaleva wore during her nearly five months of captivity in Yemen by Al Qaeda.
Though he didn't have strength to write every day, Harald Galler, who was held hostage by a group that would later become affiliated with Al Qaeda, did manage a few drawings of the places that he and other hostages were held in southern Algeria. They often saw beautiful sunsets over the rocky ridges.
The burqa that Leila Kaleva wore during her nearly five months of captivity in Yemen by Al Qaeda.
For the 54 days that Harald Ickler was held captive in the Sahara Desert by an Al Qaeda affiliated terrorist group, he ate every meal out of this bowl with this spoon. Most days, he and other hostages were given a thin soup of flour and water. In the morning it had sugar, in the middle of the day, salt, and in the afternoon, "Classic" as Ickler calls it, with neither salt nor sugar. One time the mujahideen who were holding his group killed a camel and they received a bit of meat. "That was like Christmas for us," said Ickler.
Glenna Gordon


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Every so often Take Two presents our Picture This segment, a conversation with photographers about their work.

Glenna Gordon is a journalist and photographer whose subject matter is one of the most unusual in our series. She captures images from people who were kidnapped and held hostage. 

But not images of their actual captivity, but of the objects they had while being held.

Her series is titled - Artifacts of a Kidnapping - the Things they Carried Home.