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Kaiser Health News investigation: CA's In-home care recipients at risk




Maggie Belton suffers from arthritis and diabetes. The 82-year-old gets in-home care from Armida Pineda, 64, at her Pasadena apartment.
Maggie Belton suffers from arthritis and diabetes. The 82-year-old gets in-home care from Armida Pineda, 64, at her Pasadena apartment.
Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health New

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With the aging of the Baby Boomers, more elderly and disabled people than ever are receiving care in their own homes.

In California, nearly half a million low-income people are being cared for at home by relatives and others, and the state pays those caregivers through a program called In-Home Supportive Services.

An investigation by Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, found that many recipients of in-home care through the IHSS program are at risk of abuse and neglect. The program has limited oversight, and caregivers are not required to receive any training from the state.

Anna Gorman is reporting on this for Kaiser Health News. You can read and listen to Gorman's 2-part series on California's In-Home Supportive Services here:

PART 1: Neglected to death: Little oversight for in-home caregivers can lead to abuse

PART 2: Lots of responsibility, no required training, for in-home caregivers

You can learn more about Elder Care and California's In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) program here.