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Israeli-Palestinian conflict poses challenge for Obama Administration




Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu sits with U.S. President Barack Obama during a meeting in the Oval Office of the White House March 3, 2014 in Washington, D.C. Obama urged Netanyahu to
Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu sits with U.S. President Barack Obama during a meeting in the Oval Office of the White House March 3, 2014 in Washington, D.C. Obama urged Netanyahu to "seize the moment" to make peace, saying time is running out of time to negotiate an Israeli-Palestinian agreement.
Andrew Harrer-Pool/Getty Images

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As the attacks continue between Israel and Gaza, calls for a ceasefire are increasing.

President Obama called Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu last week to offer U.S. help in negotiating a ceasefire with Hamas, the Palestinian militant group that controls the Gaza strip. Secretary of State John Kerry, along with his counterparts in France and Germany, offered his help over the weekend.

But for the moment all of these calls seem to have gone unheeded, as both sides continue to trade missile fire and bombs.   

Aaron David Miller, a distinguished scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, joins Take Two to discuss what role the Obama Administration can play in bringing the parties to the negotiating table.