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How you can track wildfire recovery with your cell phone




Two photos of the same fire-ravaged site in Mt Diablo taken by hikers for the Monitoring Change project by Nerds for Nature. On the left is one by Ken-Ichi uploaded to Flickr on December 14, 2013. To the right is a picture by Guilherme Pinto on May 25, 2014
Two photos of the same fire-ravaged site in Mt Diablo taken by hikers for the Monitoring Change project by Nerds for Nature. On the left is one by Ken-Ichi uploaded to Flickr on December 14, 2013. To the right is a picture by Guilherme Pinto on May 25, 2014
Nerds for Nature

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Cal Fire has had to fight nearly 3,000 wildfires around the state so far this year, and that's expected to jump when we hit the dry and hot season in the state.

Those flames can dramatically alter the landscape in ways that are tough for scientists to track ... but YOU can help. 

A new project launching this week in Southern California has you place your cell phone on a stand to take pictures of a vista, then tag and upload it to social media.

Taken at Mount Diablo, the left is by Deborah Rapoport on February 16, 2014 to Instagram. To the right is a picture by Stuart Kirkham uploaded to Twitter on July 4, 2014.

From there, researchers can use your photos to create a timeline to assess how areas are recovering from a fire.

Dan Rademacher, co-founder of the group Nerds for Nature, originally came up with this project in Mt Diablo in Northern California, and he explains how the pictures help scientists understand the fire ravaged area as well as engage hikers to better understand the impact that blazes have on the land.