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Why Elliot Rodger's red flags weren't enough to prompt intervention




Santa Barbara County Sheriff Bill Brown, right, walks past a board showing the photos of suspected gunman Elliot Rodger and the weapons he used in Friday night's mass shooting that took place in Isla Vista, Calif., after a news conference on Saturday, May 24, 2014, in Santa Barbara, Calif. Sheriff's officials say Rodger, 22, went on a rampage near the University of California, Santa Barbara, stabbing three people to death at his apartment before shooting and killing three more in a crime spree through a nearby neighborhood. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Santa Barbara County Sheriff Bill Brown, right, walks past a board showing the photos of suspected gunman Elliot Rodger and the weapons he used in Friday night's mass shooting that took place in Isla Vista, Calif., after a news conference on Saturday, May 24, 2014, in Santa Barbara, Calif. Sheriff's officials say Rodger, 22, went on a rampage near the University of California, Santa Barbara, stabbing three people to death at his apartment before shooting and killing three more in a crime spree through a nearby neighborhood. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Jae C. Hong/AP

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In the wake of Elliot Rodger's killing spree, many people have looked to law enforcement and the mental health system, wondering what — if anything — could have been done to avert this tragedy.

Rodger had several run-ins with the local sheriffs department prior to Friday's rampage. His mother had even alerted authorities after she saw disturbing videos he posted online. But these red flags were not enough to prompt a serious intervention.

For more we're joined by Dr. George Woods. He's a forensic psychiatrist in San Francisco and the Vice President of the International Academy of Law and Mental Health.