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Damaging exotic mussels in area lake are impossible to eradicate




Clayton Strahan, senior park services officer at Lake Piru, holds a jar of quagga mussels that have been removed from monitoring devices in the lake.
Clayton Strahan, senior park services officer at Lake Piru, holds a jar of quagga mussels that have been removed from monitoring devices in the lake.
Jed Kim/KPCC
Clayton Strahan, senior park services officer at Lake Piru, holds a jar of quagga mussels that have been removed from monitoring devices in the lake.
Clayton Strahan, senior park services officer, points out a quagga mussel that is growing in Lake Piru.
Jed Kim/KPCC
Clayton Strahan, senior park services officer at Lake Piru, holds a jar of quagga mussels that have been removed from monitoring devices in the lake.
Adult quagga mussels are zebra-striped in appearance and can grow up to two inches in length.
Jed Kim/KPCC
Clayton Strahan, senior park services officer at Lake Piru, holds a jar of quagga mussels that have been removed from monitoring devices in the lake.
Invasive quagga mussels were discovered in Lake Piru in late 2013. The mussels can proliferate to the point that they clog water pipes.
Jed Kim/KPCC


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Stories about invasive species are nothing new to California. Researchers at UC Riverside estimate a new exotic species gets established somewhere in the state every 60 days.

A small, freshwater mussel called the Quagga has moved into a Southland waterway, and it's particularly damaging. KPCC's Jed Kim says they traveled a long way to get here, and we better get used to them.