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New snail species invades renovated Echo Park




An apple snail is seen behind the protective netting in one of the lotus beds in Echo Park Lake. Expert Lindsey Groves says the snails are likely to develop an appetite for the park's famous lotuses.
An apple snail is seen behind the protective netting in one of the lotus beds in Echo Park Lake. Expert Lindsey Groves says the snails are likely to develop an appetite for the park's famous lotuses.
Katherine Davis/KPCC
An apple snail is seen behind the protective netting in one of the lotus beds in Echo Park Lake. Expert Lindsey Groves says the snails are likely to develop an appetite for the park's famous lotuses.
A small, pink egg mass of the species pomacea canaliculata, or apple snail is seen up close in Echo Park. Apple snails are native to South America and considered an invasive species in Los Angeles.
Katherine Davis/KPCC
An apple snail is seen behind the protective netting in one of the lotus beds in Echo Park Lake. Expert Lindsey Groves says the snails are likely to develop an appetite for the park's famous lotuses.
Apple snail eggs are seen in the lake at Echo Park. The snail eggs started appearing in the lake just months after the lake reopened to the public after its $45 million restoration project.
Katherine Davis/KPCC
An apple snail is seen behind the protective netting in one of the lotus beds in Echo Park Lake. Expert Lindsey Groves says the snails are likely to develop an appetite for the park's famous lotuses.
Apple snail egg masses cover a wall of Echo Park Lake.
Katherine Davis/KPCC


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There’s a new species inhabiting the grounds of the freshly renovated Echo Park Lake, snails. The snails can reach the size of a small apple and they lay many bright pink eggs, which are visible throughout the whole park.

KPCC’s Katherine Davis finds out more about the new invaders.