News and culture through the lens of Southern California.
Hosted by

SCOTUS strikes down Arizona's voter ID law




People stand in front of the U.S. Supreme Court building June 17, 2013 in Washington DC. Today the high court ruled 7-2 to throw out Arizona's voter approved requirement which meant that prospective voters prove their U.S. citizenship in order to use a registration form produced under the federal
People stand in front of the U.S. Supreme Court building June 17, 2013 in Washington DC. Today the high court ruled 7-2 to throw out Arizona's voter approved requirement which meant that prospective voters prove their U.S. citizenship in order to use a registration form produced under the federal "Motor Voter" law.
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Listen to story

07:34
Download this story 3MB

No Prop 8 decision yet today, court watchers, but the Supreme Court did decide a case next door in Arizona. The Supreme Court struck down the state's voter ID law in a 7-2 decision. The case is called Arizona v. Inter Tribal Council, with a majority written by Justice Antonin Scalia. 

Here to tell us more is Richard Hasen, a professor specializing in election law at UC Irvine and the author of the forthcoming book "The Voting Wars: From Florida 2000 to the Next Election Meltdown."