<em>Patt Morrison</em> is known for its innovative discussions of local politics and culture, as well as its presentation of the effects of national and world news on Southern California.
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Debating Proposition 19—will California feel the effects of the high?




Proposition 19 would legalize the consumption of marijuana by those 21 and older as long as they were in a non-public place such as a home or in a place that held a license for on-site consumption.
Proposition 19 would legalize the consumption of marijuana by those 21 and older as long as they were in a non-public place such as a home or in a place that held a license for on-site consumption.
David Buimovitch/AFP/Getty Images

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Ready to hear some decisive and unyeilding statements? Good, because it is election season and the time has come to discuss this year’s smokin' hot propisition - 19. Proposition 19 would legalize the consumption of marijuana by those 21 and older as long as they were in a non-public place such as a home or in a place that held a license for on-site consumption, the way a bar is licensed for liquor consumption. 19 would also allow the growing of marijuana at a private residence as long as the space didn't exceed 25 square feet and was only grown for personal use. Proponents of the prop argue that it would not only end the drug war but fix the budget, save on prison costs, free up law enforcement to focus on violent and property crimes and create between 60,000 - 110,000 new jobs in the state. Sounds good right? Wait, there is more. Those that oppose the prop say that not only would the passing of 19 be a public policy nightmare but it won't fix the budget because there is no price, tax or production structure written into the proposition, it would lead to a sobering increase in under the influence drivers and potentially lead to an increase in money that the state spends on substance abuse.

Guests:

Dale Jones, spokesperson with Yes on 19; Executive Chancellor of Oaksterdam University

Tim Rosales, Campaign Manager, No on 19

Chief Kim Raney, Chief of the Covina Police Department; vice president of the California Police Chiefs Association

Joseph McNamara, research fellow at the Hoover Institute at Stanford University, former Chief of Police of San Jose (15 years); he spent 35 years in law enforcement, is a member of the California Police Chiefs Association and is a founding member of Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP)

Alan Zaremberg, President and Chief Executive Officer of the California Chamber of Commerce

Dan Rush, statewide special operations director for the United Food & Commercial Workers (UFCW), Local 5, the largest agricultural union in the state

George Mull, President, California Cannabis Association, a group of medical marijuana providers seeking statewide regulation of marijuana

Alice Huffman, President, California National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)

Beau Kilmer, co-director of the RAND Drug Policy Research Center; co-author of their recent reports on the fiscal and social impacts of legalization of marijuana.