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Could Importing Seawater Save The Salton Sea? We Discuss The Implications




Brackish water turns red with micro-organisms as the rising Salton Sea floods brush north of Calipatria, CA, July 29, 2000.
Brackish water turns red with micro-organisms as the rising Salton Sea floods brush north of Calipatria, CA, July 29, 2000.
David McNew/Getty Images

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Salton Sea water levels continue to go down and that poses a number of problems for nearby communities and the organisms living in the water. A number of proposals being considered are focusing on the idea of importing seawater across the state’s desert to solve the problem. 

Environment reporter Mark Odalde’s new piece looks at the proposed plans. The California Natural Resources Agency is tasked with coming with a long-term fix, but the deadline is approaching. Odalde says the agency owes the state a plan by the end of 2022. 

Today on AirTalk, we break down what’s happening with the Salton Sea, the proposals being considered and the various implications. Do you have questions? Join the conversation by calling 866-893-5722.  

We reached out to the California Natural Resources Agency, but the agency was unable to make someone available for an interview.

With guest host Sharon McNary

Guests: 

Mark Olalde, environment reporter for ProPublica’s Southwest office, his piece is “Clock is ticking on dreams of saving Salton Sea with water from Mexico's Sea of Cortez;” he tweets @MarkOlalde

Michael Cohen, a senior researcher at the Oakland-based Pacific Institute, a think tank that focuses on water conservation issues

Timothy Bradley, professor emeritus of ecology and evolutionary biology at UC Irvine; he has been working on issues related to the Salton Sea and salt lakes for decades