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Federal Regulators Order Inspections Of Boeing 777s Following Engine Failure




Pieces of an airplane engine from Flight 328 sit scattered in a neighborhood on February 20, 2021 in Broomfield, Colorado.
Pieces of an airplane engine from Flight 328 sit scattered in a neighborhood on February 20, 2021 in Broomfield, Colorado.
Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

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Federal aviation regulators are ordering United Airlines to step up inspections of all Boeing 777s equipped with the type of engine that suffered a catastrophic failure over Denver on Saturday.

United said it is temporarily removing those aircraft from service, as meanwhile Boeing recommended grounding aircraft with that model engine until the Federal Aviation.

The announcements come a day after United Airlines Flight 328 had to make an emergency landing at Denver International Airport after its right engine blew apart just after takeoff. Pieces of the casing of the engine, a Pratt & Whitney PW4000, rained down on suburban neighborhoods.

The plane with 231 passengers and 10 crew on board landed safely, and nobody aboard or on the ground was reported hurt, authorities said. Boeing said it supported decisions by the Japan Civil Aviation Bureau and FAA to suspend operations of all 777 aircraft powered by Pratt & Whitney 4000-112 engines. It said there were 69 of the engines in service and another 59 in storage.

Today on AirTalk, we discuss the engine failure and what it means for Boeing and its recent history of safety problems. Do you have questions? Give us a call at 866-893-5722. 

Guests:

David Shepardson, reporter covering transportation and aviation for Reuters; he tweets @davidshepardson

Alan Levin, covers aviation safety for Bloomberg News; he tweets @AlanLevin1