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Security questions stifle the Obama administration’s internet transfer




A screen shows a rolling feed of new 'Generic Top-Level Domain Names (gTLDs) which have been applied for during a press conference hosted by ICANN in central London, on June 13, 2012.
A screen shows a rolling feed of new 'Generic Top-Level Domain Names (gTLDs) which have been applied for during a press conference hosted by ICANN in central London, on June 13, 2012.
Andrew Cowie/AFP/Getty Images

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A long-planned transfer of internet oversight from the Obama administration to a nonprofit group is scheduled for Oct. 1.

In an effort to maintain global support and an open internet, the move would give domain name control to the Los Angeles-based Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, or Icann. The plan was announced by the Obama administration in August.

So what does this mean for the general public? According an article from The Wall Street Journal, Icann has already been overseeing a large part of internet operations. The federal government’s role has been to act as a backstop. The government’s contract with Icann is set to expire on Sept. 30.

But GOP lawmakers have recently taken steps to stop the hand-off. A letter was sent earlier this month by four congressional committees which argued that unresolved issues with the plan were still in question. The letter prompted Attorney General Loretta Lynch to reevaluate the transfer.

Republican Senator Ted Cruz of Texas has also been vocal about his opposition to the hand-off, expressing domain security concerns.

Larry speaks to Chris Mondini with Icann and Berin Szoka of TechFreedom to hear both sides of the issues surrounding the controversial internet hand-off.

Guests:

Chris Mondini, vice president of Icann’s Global Stakeholder Engagement for North America

Berin Szoka, president of TechFreedom.org, a tech-policy think tank in Washington D.C.