Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 am - 12 pm

Weighing severity of Sec. Kerry's ultimatum to Russia over Aleppo "barbarism"




US Secretary of State John Kerry (L) and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov speak to the press at the Hotel Intercontinental on September 12, 2013 in Geneva, Switzerland.
US Secretary of State John Kerry (L) and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov speak to the press at the Hotel Intercontinental on September 12, 2013 in Geneva, Switzerland.
Harold Cunningham/Getty Images

Listen to story

14:02
Download this story 6MB

WASHINGTON (AP) - Secretary of State John Kerry threatened on Wednesday to end all cooperation between the United States and Russia to stop Syria's civil war, unless Russian and Syrian government attacks on Aleppo end. More than 250 people are believed to have been killed in the besieged city in the last week.

Kerry's warning came in a telephone call Wednesday to Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, the State Department said, describing the latest U.S. ultimatum in Syria's 5½-year conflict. Many have gone unfulfilled, including President Barack Obama's declaration that the U.S. would take military action if Syrian President Bashar Assad crossed the "red line" of using chemical weapons.

It was unclear what effect Kerry's words would have.

"The burden remains on Russia to stop this assault and allow humanitarian access to Aleppo and other areas in need," Kerry told Lavrov, according to State Department spokesman John Kirby.

Kerry said the U.S. is preparing to "suspend U.S.-Russia bilateral engagement on Syria," including talks on a possible counter-extremist partnership, "unless Russia takes immediate steps to end the assault on Aleppo and restore" a cease-fire.

Government shelling and airstrikes landed near a bread distribution center and two hospitals in Aleppo on Wednesday. Activists and medics reported several people killed. They said at least one of the medical facilities was no longer operable, leaving the country's biggest city with only six functioning hospitals.

What other options could the United States exercise?

With files from Associate Press. 

Guests: 

Anton Fedyashin, Professor of Russian History, American University

Mohsen Milani, Executive Director, USF World Center for Strategic & Diplomatic Studies Professor, Department of Government & International Affairs, University of South Florida