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More evidence of Clinton Foundation influence at State Department




Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton delivers opening remarks during a meeting with law enforcement officials at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, August 18, 2016 in New York City.
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton delivers opening remarks during a meeting with law enforcement officials at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, August 18, 2016 in New York City.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

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The Associated Press revealed yesterday that the Democratic presidential nominee met with major Clinton Foundation donors while she was the Secretary of State.

Hillary Clinton promised to keep the foundation and her work with the Obama administration separate, but the AP found that more than half of the private-interest meetings she held were with people who’d given money to her family’s global philanthropy.

The presidential hopeful has been plagued by the charity’s perceived conflicts of interest and the AP’s investigation suggests big Clinton Foundation donors might have been given special access to the State Department head.

The Trump campaign and other Hillary critics are calling it pay-to-play politics. Others say these kinds of meetings and small favors are common in Washington D.C., plus there’s no clear evidence of illegal activity or donor influence on matters of state.

Do you think the relationship between Clinton Foundation donors and the former secretary of State’s office was too cozy or is this just another case of inflated politics-as-usual?

Guests:

Doug White, non-profit expert and former director of Columbia University's Master of Science in Fundraising Management program.

Michael A. Cohen, national politics and foreign affairs columnist for the Boston Globe, and author of "American Maelstrom: The 1968 Election and the Politics of Division"