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Long lines and flawed lists mar presidential primaries in Arizona and beyond




A supporter of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton holds up a sign outside Carl Hayden High School before Clinton's Get Out the Vote campaign event on March 21, 2016 in Phoenix, Arizona.
A supporter of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton holds up a sign outside Carl Hayden High School before Clinton's Get Out the Vote campaign event on March 21, 2016 in Phoenix, Arizona.
Ralph Freso/Getty Images

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Shuttered polling locations and large voter turnout amounted to frustration and anger for some Arizona voters.

In Maricopa county, voters waited five hours or more in some places to cast primary ballots, while police were called to help control traffic.

Election officials said they miscalculated the demand for polling places and due to cost-cutting reduced the number of polling places to 60 from 200-plus four years ago. In Utah, caucus-goers were dispatched by poll workers to local stores with orders buy reams of paper and photocopy fresh ballots amid huge turnout.

The state Democratic Party's website crashed due to high traffic. In Idaho, some lines stretched a mile long. Are caucus and primary processes too arcane and flawed? What could improve the primary process?

Guest:

Lonna Rae Atkeson, Professor of Political Science, University of New Mexico; Director for the Center for the Study of Voting, Elections, and Democracy, University of New Mexico; Rae has been monitoring elections in various states this cycle, including Washington this coming Saturday