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Liberal economists debate viability of Sanders’s education plan




 A supporter of U.S. Senator and Democratic Presidential Candidate Bernie Sanders  holds a sign at Sanders' first campaign rally in Michigan at Eastern Michigan University.
A supporter of U.S. Senator and Democratic Presidential Candidate Bernie Sanders holds a sign at Sanders' first campaign rally in Michigan at Eastern Michigan University.
Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

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AirTalk fact checks one of the defining pillars of his campaign--and likely appeal to millennial voters--free tuition at public universities and colleges.

Sanders claims the $75-billion a year plan will be fully paid for by “imposing a tax of a fraction of a percent on Wall Street speculators.”

While there are left-leaning people that theoretically applaud the spirit behind making higher-education affordable for all, they question the pragmatics of the Sanders plan.

Might college students capable of paying tuition, forgo it in favor of attending a high-quality free public school, thereby overloading those colleges? Is it realistic to impose the taxes Sanders suggests? Where exactly are those taxes coming from?

Guests:

Gerald Friedman, Professor of Economics, University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Jared Bernstein, Senior Fellow at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and former Chief Economist and Economic Advisor to Vice President Joe Biden; @econjared