Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 am - 12 pm

After Scalia, gauging political will for Supreme Court term limits




An American flag flies at half mast following the death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia at the U.S. Supreme Court, February 14, 2016 in Washington, DC.
An American flag flies at half mast following the death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia at the U.S. Supreme Court, February 14, 2016 in Washington, DC.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Listen to story

17:28
Download this story 8MB

No matter their politics, the top legal minds in the U.S. tend to favor 18-year term limits for Supreme Court justices (with a small minority leery of thrusting the Court regularly into election battles).

They argue that longer life-spans and an increasingly politicized bench are not what the founders intended in offering lifetime tenure in the Constitution.

However, creating term limits would require an amendment - two-thirds of Congress to propose it and 38 of the 50 states to ratify it.

In the current climate, could Congressional leaders and President Barack Obama gin up support for such an amendment?

Guests:

Erwin Chemerinsky, Founding dean of the School of Law at UC Irvine and an expert on constitutional law

Roy Englert, Appellate Litigator based in Washington, D.C. who has argued 20 cases at the Supreme Court