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Wake of Chattanooga reignites debate over military ‘gun-free zones’




Eli Arnold places an American flag in the memorial in front of the Armed Forces Career Center/National Guard Recruitment Office which had been shot up on July 17, 2015 in Chattanooga, Tennessee. According to reports, Mohammod Youssuf Abdulazeez, 24, opened fire on the military recruiting station on July 16th at the strip mall and then drove to an operational support center operated by the U.S. Navy and killed four United States Marines there, more than seven miles away.
Eli Arnold places an American flag in the memorial in front of the Armed Forces Career Center/National Guard Recruitment Office which had been shot up on July 17, 2015 in Chattanooga, Tennessee. According to reports, Mohammod Youssuf Abdulazeez, 24, opened fire on the military recruiting station on July 16th at the strip mall and then drove to an operational support center operated by the U.S. Navy and killed four United States Marines there, more than seven miles away.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

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Gun-rights supporters are arguing that lives could have been saved in last week’s shooting of four unarmed Marines in a “gun free zone” in Chattanooga, TN if only soldiers were permitted to carry weapons.

They’re currently not, thanks to a 1993 directive that was generated by the H.W. Bush administration and tweaked by the Clinton administration, and allows only military police to carry weapons on bases and reserve centers.

Gun rights activists argue that the military police often can't respond to an attack instantly, and those few minutes could mean the difference in how many people survive and that the gun-free policy also makes military facilities bigger targets last week’s shooting -- points that were made after the Fort Hood shooting in 2009 and the Washington Navy Yard shooting in 2013.

After an onslaught of criticism from gun-rights activists and Donald Trump, on Friday, Gen. Ray Odierno, chief of staff of the Army, pledged to review security procedures at military bases and recruiting centers.

Do you think military bases and reserve centers should remain gun-free zones?

Guests:

Brian Lepley, spokesperson for the U.S. Army Recruiting Command Center

Jack McCauley, Fellow with the Crime Prevention Research Center; retired Captain with the Maryland State Police

Ari Freilich, staff attorney with the Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence