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In Harper Lee’s long-awaited sequel, a changed Atticus Finch




A staff member re-stocks copies of Harper Lee's eagerly awaited, but controversial second novel
A staff member re-stocks copies of Harper Lee's eagerly awaited, but controversial second novel "Go Set a Watchman" at a bookstore in the Central district of Hong Kong on July 14, 2015.
ISAAC LAWRENCE/AFP/Getty Images

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Few novels have had the kind of cultural impact as Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird.” Its sequel, “Go Set a Watchman,” comes out in bookstores today.

The release of the follow-up has been shrouded in controversy, with friends of the author questioning whether the 88-year-old Lee is healthy enough to authorize the new work.

Fans of the original work are in for a big surprise, as reviews of the sequel show that the incorruptible Atticus Finch, the paragon of righteousness, has become a bigot and a supporter of segregation.

How does this new depiction change the way you read “To Kill a Mockingbird”?

Guests:

Dana Williams, professor of English at Howard University, where she specializes in contemporary African American literature