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Second nurse contracts Ebola in United States




Senior Matron Breda Athan demonstrates the procedure when preparing to treat potential patients with Ebola on August 12, 2014 in London, England.
Senior Matron Breda Athan demonstrates the procedure when preparing to treat potential patients with Ebola on August 12, 2014 in London, England.
Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

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Last week, the country faced one of its most recent fears as a man who returned to Texas from Liberia died due to Ebola; this week, a second nurse has contracted the disease on domestic soil. As dozens of people are held under quarantine, extensive media coverage of the disease is continuing and reports are coming out daily with new developments. West African healthcare workers, airports and travel agencies, hospitals around the nation, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are among those under the spotlight as the virus has begun its domestic spread. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) have come under fire for not putting more money into vaccine research and creating structures for containment of highly infectious diseases, although the institution contends that this is due to severe budget cuts over the last decade.

Are you scared that Ebola will become an epidemic in the United States? Is our healthcare system and infrastructure prepared to deal with this crisis? Should quarantine be implemented more widely as the spread has occurred here?

Guests:

Eric Aasen, digital news editor at KERA, the NPR affiliate in Dallas, Texas, who’s been reporting on the outbreak in Dallas

Dr. Amesh Adalja, MD, an infectious disease doctor and a representative of the Infectious Diseases Society of America