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Board of Supervisors weighs whether to continue allowing ICE agents in county jails




An immate uses a mirror to look outside his cell at the Los Angeles Men's Central Jail in downtown Los Angeles, 19 May 2004.
An immate uses a mirror to look outside his cell at the Los Angeles Men's Central Jail in downtown Los Angeles, 19 May 2004.
ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images

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Tomorrow the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors takes up the question of whether to extend a controversial program that allows U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents to be placed in county jails.

The idea behind the program, known at 287(g), is to allow ICE agents to question inmates convicted of certain felonies about their immigration status, with the hope of possibly deporting those who are in the country illegally. Supporters of the program, such as outgoing Supervisor and City Council candidate Gloria Molina, say it’s an important tool for immigration enforcement and sends the message that “if you’re a convicted felon, you’re not welcome in our community.” But opponents argue that it erodes trust in law enforcement among immigrant communities and opens the county to legal liability by confusing criminal law enforcement with immigration enforcement.

Guests:

Gloria Molina, outgoing Supervisor and City Council candidate

Chris Newman, the Legal Director of the National Day Laborer Organizing Network