Politics

Obama invites teen Ahmed Mohamed to White House after 'bomb hoax' incident

This photo provided by the Irving Police Department shows the homemade clock that Ahmed Mohamed brought to school,  Wednesday, Sept.16, 2015, in Irving. Police detained the 14-year-old Muslim boy after a teacher at MacArthur High School decided that the homemade clock he brought to class looked like a bomb, according to school and police officials. The family of Ahmed Mohamed said the boy was suspended for three days from the school in the Dallas suburb.
This photo provided by the Irving Police Department shows the homemade clock that Ahmed Mohamed brought to school, Wednesday, Sept.16, 2015, in Irving. Police detained the 14-year-old Muslim boy after a teacher at MacArthur High School decided that the homemade clock he brought to class looked like a bomb, according to school and police officials. The family of Ahmed Mohamed said the boy was suspended for three days from the school in the Dallas suburb.
Irving Police via AP

Ahmed Mohamed, 14, was handcuffed and taken away from his school in Irving, Texas, earlier this week after school officials grew suspicious of a digital clock he had made in a pencil case over the weekend. Expressing his admiration for the high school student's curiosity about science, President Obama has invited Mohamed to the White House.

President Obama's tweet

Teachers and police weren't satisfied with Mohamed's explanation that his invention was simply a clock. After they questioned him about the possibility that he was trying to perpetrate a bomb hoax, Mohamed was suspended for three days, the student's family says.

President Obama isn't the only person to voice support of Mohamed, who is a freshman at MacArthur High School. The hashtag #IStandWithAhmed is drawing thousands of messages on Instagram and on Twitter.

Modified NASA logo

One image that was posted was a revised version of the NASA logo — the teen was wearing a NASA T-shirt when he was detained by police.

In many others, people simply photographed themselves with clocks.

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