Business & Economy

Los Angeles commission votes to make Norms a historic landmark

New owners have a demolition permit for the iconic Norms Restaurant building on La Cienega. The structure is representative of the Googie architecture movement which originated in Southern California.
New owners have a demolition permit for the iconic Norms Restaurant building on La Cienega. The structure is representative of the Googie architecture movement which originated in Southern California.
Maya Sugarman/KPCC
New owners have a demolition permit for the iconic Norms Restaurant building on La Cienega. The structure is representative of the Googie architecture movement which originated in Southern California.
New owners have a demolition permit for the iconic Norms Restaurant building on La Cienega. The structure is representative of the Googie architecture movement which originated in Southern California.
Maya Sugarman/KPCC
New owners have a demolition permit for the iconic Norms Restaurant building on La Cienega. The structure is representative of the Googie architecture movement which originated in Southern California.
New owners have a demolition permit for the iconic Norms Restaurant building on La Cienega. The structure is representative of the Googie architecture movement which originated in Southern California.
Maya Sugarman/KPCC
New owners have a demolition permit for the iconic Norms Restaurant building on La Cienega. The structure is representative of the Googie architecture movement which originated in Southern California.
New owners have a demolition permit for the iconic Norms Restaurant building on La Cienega. The structure is representative of the Googie architecture movement which originated in Southern California.
Maya Sugarman/KPCC
New owners have a demolition permit for the iconic Norms Restaurant building on La Cienega. The structure is representative of the Googie architecture movement which originated in Southern California.
New owners have a demolition permit for the iconic Norms Restaurant building on La Cienega. The structure is representative of the Googie architecture movement which originated in Southern California.
Maya Sugarman/KPCC
New owners have a demolition permit for the iconic Norms Restaurant building on La Cienega. The structure is representative of the Googie architecture movement which originated in Southern California.
New owners have a demolition permit for the iconic Norms Restaurant building on La Cienega. The structure is representative of the Googie architecture movement which originated in Southern California.
Maya Sugarman/KPCC
New owners have a demolition permit for the iconic Norms Restaurant building on La Cienega. The structure is representative of the Googie architecture movement which originated in Southern California.
New owners have a demolition permit for the iconic Norms Restaurant building on La Cienega. The structure is representative of the Googie architecture movement which originated in Southern California.
Maya Sugarman/KPCC


The Norms restaurant at La Cienega is closer to being designated a landmark after a Thursday vote. Los Angeles's Cultural Heritage Commission voted unanimously to make this location a "historic cultural monument."

The vote still has to be approved by the full City Council; Council Member Paul Koretz has already voiced his approval for the project, Los Angeles Magazine reports.

The Norms chains posted a celebratory Facebook message thanking their supporters.

 

The location is considered a prime of example of "Googie architecture," a 1950s vision of what the future would look like.

"This building embodies the forces of change and the optimism looking toward the future that was a historical characteristic of Los Angeles in this period of time," architect Alan Hess told KPCC earlier this year. "That's why it is historically so significant."

The Googie features include its prominent angled roof and integrated sign, the use of glass and the restaurant's natural landscaping. Hess prepared the nomination for Norms to be considered for a watch list of historic buildings that could be in danger kept by the Los Angeles Conservancy.