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Politics

Maven's Morning Coffee: Board of Supervisors' hiring spree, John Deasy speaks out, Neel Kashkari defends TV ad



Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas says his colleagues are making last-minute appointments so they can extend their influence beyond their tenure.
Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas says his colleagues are making last-minute appointments so they can extend their influence beyond their tenure.
Damian Dovarganes/AP

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

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Today is Friday, Oct. 17 and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

Vox suggests Gov. Jerry Brown gets too much credit for turning California around. "Brown's contribution involved adopting an austerity program which most liberals would find objectionable in at least some particulars, the tax increases that helped weren't solely his doing, and he's left enough work undone that there's a real danger the state will fall back into old patterns once he's gone," according to the piece.

Republican gubernatorial candidate Neel Kashkari told KQED he will not apologize for a campaign ad that equates Gov. Jerry Brown's stance on public education to a child drowning in a swimming pool. "I wanted the most powerful image I could to let people know about Jerry Brown’s betrayal," Kashkari said.

LAUSD Superintendent John Deasy told NPR's Morning Edition that his leadership style may have played a role in ending his tenure at the country's second-largest school district. "I certainly am responsible and consequential for my style of leadership and my agenda, which was students' rights first," he said, adding that that "definitely made some adults uncomfortable."

KPCC looks at the Board of Supervisors' hiring spree, which comes just months before two new supervisors will be sworn into office. "There’s a desire on the part of the majority of the board as currently is constituted to make these decisions, because they can and arguably it preserves this board’s ability to govern beyond their term," said Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas.

A report from the Human Relations Commission finds L.A. County experiences at least one hate crime a day, according to the Los Angeles Times. And the majority of hate crimes are either never reported or never classified as a hate crime. "The 384 hate crimes reported in the county in 2013 was the lowest total since record-keeping began in 1980, and blacks, Latinos, Jews and members of the LGBT community were victims of fewer hate crimes than in 2012," per the Times.

Press Conferences

None

Upcoming Votes

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