Multi-American | How immigrants are redefining 'American' in Southern California

In immigration news: Ebola as political border threat, the complexity of 287(g), a binational family, more



A hazmat worker prepares to enter an apartment  where a second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on October 13, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. Meanwhile in politics, some have been invoking Ebola as as the latest border threat.
A hazmat worker prepares to enter an apartment where a second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on October 13, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. Meanwhile in politics, some have been invoking Ebola as as the latest border threat.
Mike Stone/Getty Images

Scott Brown: Anyone with Ebola can ‘walk across’ our ‘porous’ border - Washington Post The latest political border threat may be moving from ISIS terrorists to disease in the wake of Ebola virus. From the piece: "Case in point: Scott Brown, who is running against Senator Jeanne Shaheen in New Hampshire. In an interview with WGIR radio...Brown was asked whether he favored travel restrictions on some passengers in and out of West Africa. He replied: '...For example, we have people coming into our country by legal means bringing in diseases and other potential challenges. Yet we have a border that’s so porous that anyone can walk across it.'"

Complex rules govern LA Sheriff's Dept. partnership with ICE, triggering criticism - Southern California Public Radio  Now that the Los Angeles County board of supervisors has voted to renew a controversial federal-local partnership known as 287(g), Sheriff's Department officials say they'll focus on identifying and detaining only immigrant jail inmates convicted of felonies and serious crimes. But who gets identified and turned over to to immigration agents hasn't always been well defined; some critics say the rules still aren't specific enough, and misconceptions abound.

When Immigration Isn’t a One-Way Street - Zocalo Public Square On one family's complicated generations-long history as both Chinese and American, starting with a great-grandfather who came to the U.S. to work on the railroads. From the story: "That’s what drew my great-grandpa to California. He came alone, leaving his wife and children back in Guangdong province in southern China. My grandpa was just 1 at the time." His son joined him decades later in Oakland as an adult, when he brought his own family to the U.S. in the 1960s.

Buckeye PD: Officer used 'poor choice of words' during stop -  CBS 5 Arizona Police officials in Buckeye, Arizona say their officer "used a poor choice of words when he pulled over a man in Buckeye on Friday. CBS 5 News obtained the video from the driver in the traffic stop, where the officer told the man, 'If you do something here, I will kill you.' "Cops said they learned of the video via social media. 

Alison Lundergan Grimes hit on immigration, from left - Politico From the story: "The liberal advocacy group MoveOn is calling on Kentucky Democratic Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes to stop running an immigration ad that tries to hit Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell from the right on 'amnesty.' The ad digs up McConnell votes from the legalization program under President Ronald Reagan in an attempt to paint the top Senate Republican as weak on immigration."

Group demands lawmaker take down cartoon depicting Arizona immigration law as bigoted - Fox News Latino Members of a California-based conservative group called “We the People Rising” are upset after they saw a cartoon "which shows Arizona police officers pointing guns at immigrants traveling in a van near a highway sign that says 'Welcome to Arizona' – during a visit in the summer to the office of Long Beach Democratic Sen. Ricardo Lara."